Texas, and Southwestern neighbors like Arizona and New Mexico, are epicenters for immigration—some of it legal, some of it not, and some of it filled with quagmires that are difficult to navigate. In some instances relating to ostensibly illegal immigration, a defendant will have to face off against several agencies such as the local law enforcement agency that arrested the party in question, the United States Border Patrol, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (also referred to as ICE) and even the FBI. 

These agencies may sound intimidating, but there’s a reason so many individuals want to make it safely to the US and live there indefinitely. The US has a justice system where you can solicit legal counsel in your defense and attempt to obtain an outcome in court that most aligns with your goals, which most likely include continuing to reside in the US. You do not have to take detention or deportation as a foregone conclusion.

But immigration cases are not limited to issues around illegal immigration. Immigration laws in the United States are complex, with a variety of visas available, each with their own list of requirements and bureaucratic red tape. Sometimes the process of obtaining a much desired visa or citizenship can be painfully slow. One thing that can make this process more difficult is if issues of immigration become tied up with a criminal court case.

The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 makes it so that any visa-holding immigrant with a felony conviction can find their residence in the United States in jeopardy. Even something as small as a misdemeanor can snowball into a Federal issue that makes deportation seem like a foregone conclusion. But working with a competent lawyer familiar both with immigration law and criminal court cases can facilitate a greater likelihood of deflecting the criminal charges and remaining in the United States. Mr. Morin has over two decades of experience with Criminal Justice in Texas, and can assist you in obtaining the desired outcome should something like a felony or misdemeanor threaten your residency in the US or the immigration process you have started.