Texas is different from many states in regards to its gun laws. In fact, unlike some states, in Texas you don’t even need a permit to buy a firearm. You must be over the age of 18, and over the age of 21 to buy a handgun. However, there are instances that can result in a weapons charge, and differing rules in specific jurisdictions can add to the complexity of your case.

Texans are allowed to carry firearms, with certain restrictions. Generally speaking, it is acceptable to carry a weapon in plain sight on your own property, which includes your vehicle. Additional licensure makes it possible to carry a gun in public spaces, and even a concealed weapon. But if you don’t possess the requisite license for these privileges, carrying a concealed gun or showing a weapon in the wrong place can result in charges. Previously convicted felons and individuals under a restraining order are prohibited in most cases from carrying weapons. Lastly, any crime accompanied by possession of a firearm can automatically become labeled as violent.

Illegal possession, transportation, and sale or distribution of firearms can result in a weapons charge or unlawfully carrying a weapon (UCW) a serious blight on your personal and professional record. Moreover, the immediate consequences of a weapons charge are serious. Though it depends on the extent of activities on your criminal record (if applicable), a weapons charge can result in a number of punitive measures such as up to 10 years in prison—which can be extended beyond 15 years for already convicted felons. If possession of a firearm accompanied a crime, your prison sentence can be extended for a lifetime. Probation and very strict parole are some of the less constrictive measures that are meted out for a weapons charge, but they still make life extremely difficult. Thankfully Mr. Morin has over two decades of criminal law experience and can help you navigate a gun possession charge.